PAPERgraphic

December 28, 2008

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Beautiful beautiful beautiful illustrations by russion graphic design who is now based in London. I would love to see how she makes those!

A Merry Christmas video by AKQA.

Still hoping for snow…

December 23, 2008

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“Since 1997, the building known locally as “The House of Falling Furniture” located at the corner of 6th st. and Howard st. in San Francisco, has been a sculptural mural.The piece consists of sometimes malshapened tables, chairs, lamps and even a grandfather clock, all hanging precariously out of the building’s windows. Officially named, ‘Defenestration’ (a word meaning to throw out of a window) the sculpture’s various pieces are all fastened to the abandoned building to create the illusion of falling. The pieces is the brainchild of local Bay Area artist, Brian Goggin.”I wanted to get art out of the gallery and out of the museum,” said Goggin. “I’m interested in working with absurdity in ways that are compelling and entertaining.”


“The site is part of a neighborhood that historically has faced economic challenge and has often endured the stigma of skid row status. Reflecting the harsh experience of many members of the community, the furniture is also of the streets, cast-off and unappreciated. The simple, unpretentious beauty and humanity of these downtrodden objects is reawakened through the action of the piece. The act of “throwing out” becomes an uplifting gesture of release, inviting reflection on the spirit of the people we live with, the objects we encounter, and the places in which we live.”

(I took the quotes directly from the artists websitethis time.)

Magical worlds

December 13, 2008

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Beautiful illustrations/photoshops by a russian designer/artist. I have no idea what his name is actually, but you can find his blog (in russian but with many many more images) at Tebe Interesno.

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His magical creatures look so real… and still like snapshots out of a fairytale.

Sorted Books

December 8, 2008

Another example of transforming books: The wonderful Sorted Books project by the California-born artist Nina Katchadourian.
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It ” has taken place in many different places over the years, ranging form private homes to specialized public book collections. The process is the same in every case: culling through a collection of books, pulling particular titles, and eventually grouping the books into clusters so that the titles can be read in sequence, from top to bottom. The final results are shown either as photographs of the book clusters or as the actual stacks themselves, shown on the shelves of the library they were drawn from. Taken as a whole, the clusters from each sorting aim to examine that particular library’s focus, idiosyncrasies, and inconsistencies — a cross-section of that library’s holdings.”
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What a creative idea!

Also check out her Map projects. Actually look through her whole website, all her works are very unique and interesting and showcase her extreme creativity. For example the story of Chloe (under the Confused Animals) or the Mended spiderwebs (featured here before) or Finlnds unnamed islands.

Book art

December 3, 2008

Books in itself are wonderful things i think. Those fantastic worlds that are hidden within, just visualized through 26 (or 29 in Germany) plain black and white letters. But their form can be very aesthetic too and can (and is often) be transformed into art.

Here are some nice photographies i found.
(though i couldn´t find the photographer´s name, if anybody knows him/her i´d appreciate if you´d let me know)

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Snow

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VTOL

November 23, 2008


VTOL means Vertical Take Off and Landing, an installation by designers Kram/Weisshaar, which was shown during the Vienna Design Week this ocotober outside the went Liechtenstein Museum.

Their organic concrete surface seems to float above the ground. Smart use of mirros combined with an using an innovative glass fibre-reinforced concrete called fibreC. A really beautiful sculpture.

I found the most wonderful story today and just had to share it (even if it´s kind of long).

Franz Gsellmann, an austrian farmer was born in 1910, as a child he wanted to be an electrician but his father didn´t allow him to start an apprenticeship so he became a farmer. But for all his life he remained fascinated by moving objects, the mechanical interaction of modern machines. He dreamed of building a machine but lacked a characteristic element for the construction of his machine. Until he saw the Atomium of the 1958 Brussels world fair in his local newspaper. The farmer boarded the train and went to brussels. The journey to three days but was worth it: Gsellmann had found the heart of his machine. He went home and started working.
Franz gsellmann and his machine
For the next 23 years he worked on his wondrous machine and never during all his life told what purpose or meaning his machine was supposed to have. He went to Graz, Vienna and many fleamarkets all over on a bike to find objects and small treasures for his machine, among them a small dutch windmill, an eagle made from china, 5 crosses, seven generators and 200 lightbulbs. No one was allowed into the room where he build his machine, not even his wife.

In the attic, photographed by Franz Killmeyer

In the attic, photographed by Franz Killmeyer


In his village nobody understood him and they ridiculed him. Often he would go to the attic when the mocking grew too much to handle; there he would mourn and cry himself to sleep.

But in the night of 1968 as all lights went off in his tiny village, the people there knew: Gsellmann did it. In that night he turned on his machine. 12 switches were needed. Then green, red and blue wheels started to turn, hundreds of tiny lamps started blinking , it was creaking and humming and squealing. The whole thing is 6 meters long, 3 meters high and 2 meters wide. In its middle a tiny Atomium is rotating and a glass Holy-Mary statue is shining with tiny lightbulbs surrounding it like a rose wreath.
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And nobody knows what it is.

“When a human is gifted, it´s like an inner drive. It´s like in spring when a rosebush starts growing tiny buds, and in may,june the roses are there. like this it drives me year after year.” Franz Gsellmann, builder of the worlds-maschine.
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Over time his magical machine began to drew visitors. Legend has it that even the artist Jean Tinguely, who builds kinetic sculptures and has his art displayed at the MoMa and the Tate, traveled to the farm to see the machine.

Gsellmann kept perfecting his machine until his death. The family claims that one day after he went to his wife to tell her his machine was finished, he simply went to bed and died.

It´s such a beautiful (and kind of sad) story and my translation doesn´t really does it justice. I really hope that Mr. Gsellmann was satisfied with his machine and that it turned out how he wanted it too. And that he is watching from heaven now, seeing people take enjoyment in his machine and that they are in awe of his accomplishment and dedication.

Here is a beautiful article about Gsellmann and his miracle machine (in german).

And the website of the museum at his house where the machine still stands (in german).

There is also a book about him on amazon (in german): Der Weltenmaschinenroman.